23.86 Acre Slice of Serenity

13661 NE 247 Lane Fort McCoy, FL 32134

This is a beautiful 23.86 +/- fenced acre heaven sitting on two paved road frontages (CR 315 and NE 247th Lane) and having two addresses. Because the property backs up to the governmentally preserved land, wildlife including deer, turkey, and many others are plentiful. The land has so many large, beautiful trees. The 2000 manufactured home is well kept and move-in ready with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, and 2280 living square feet. The house has a spacious open floor plan including a dining room, living room, kitchen, and laundry room. The kitchen includes lots of cabinets and counter spaces, with a large island and all appliances are included. The living room is spacious with lots of windows and natural light. The main bedroom is nicely sized with a bathroom including a garden tub, shower, and privacy toilet plus a large walk-in closet. Guest bedrooms are spacious as well. The large bonus room is currently used as a billiard/game room, which could also be used as another bedroom, office, or family room setup. Next to the billiard room is a half bath that offers easy access from outside or for entertaining guests. The front deck is 12×16 and great for enjoying a morning cup of coffee or watching the sunset in the evening. Outside will find 2 storage sheds (12×24 & 11×24) w/ power and water and a large chicken coop. Located within minutes from a boat ramp of the Ocklawaha River, grocery store, doctor’s office, pharmacy, hardware, convenience store, gas station, pizza delivery, and more. It is within 30 minutes to either Silver Springs, which is great for kayaking, boating, and outdoor activities or Ocala or Gainesville (Home of the Florida Gators) with Walmart, Lowes, Bealls, Outback, and many large shopping malls, and restaurants. The property is within minutes of Ocklawaha River, Rodman Reservoir boat ramp, Ocala National Forest, and many natural springs (Salt Springs, Silver Glen Springs, Juniper Springs) with horseback and walking trails, and off-road vehicle trails awaiting explorations while being in short drives to Ocala or Gainesville making it one of a kind property and location!

  • 23+/- Acres 
  • Zoned A1 (agriculture) 
  • 3 Bedrooms 
  • 2 Bathrooms 
  • 2000 Mobile Home
  • 2280Living Sq Ft

Asking Price $ 480,000

 

21694 NE 133rd Street, Salt Springs ~ $

Just like new 2020 with Lake Kerr access just few minutes away on beautiful 2800 acre Lake Kerr. This lovely 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom manufactured home is 960 living square feet, super clean and move in ready. Upon arriving you will notice the privacy with no neighbors and lots of trees surrounding the property, plus added bonus…it borders the Ocala National Forests in the back of the property. There is crushed concrete gravel driveway and a 8’x18′ wood deck with little view of Lake from front deck. Entering the home you will see open floor plan of living room and kitchen with dining area. Lots of windows provide nice natural light and kitchen has lots of cabinet and counter space, plus an island. Hallway has laundry area, including stacked washer/dryer and additional storage. Main bedroom is cozy in size with large closet and main bathroom includes shower. Guest bathroom has shower/tub combo and guest bedroom is perfect size as well. From dining area off kitchen there is back door leading to 12’x30′ concrete pad, fenced yard and wood storage shed. The property is nicely maintained and turn key ready for new owners. Don’t miss your chance to see and buy this awesome slice of heaven tucked away in beautiful Salt Springs, Florida. Located in the heart of the Ocala National Forest w/ beautiful Salt Springs swim area, boat launch and short ride to Lake George and the St. Johns River. Salt Springs is also home to miles and miles of ATV/SxS, Horseback and hiking trails. Great fishing year round in the many lakes, rivers and forest ponds, and don’t forget about the excellent hunting too. Close to local shopping including grocery store, Dollar General, hardware, gas station, great restaurants, entertainment and more. Only short 30 minute drive to Ocala or Palatka for all your needs.

For more info please Call/Text (352) 572-1739 or email info@homesforsaleocalamarion.com

    • 2 Bedrooms 
    • 2 Bathrooms 
    • 960 Sq Ft 
    • 2020 Modular Home 
    • 0.55 Acre Lot

Asking Price $163,900

11.24+/- Acres Fort McCoy, FL – $129,000

 

Beautiful 11.24+/- Acres includes 700′ of paved road frontage on NE 212 Street Road just North of Fort McCoy and CR 315. The acreage includes a variety of hardwoods, pines, palm trees and has some open areas. Don’t let this A-1, Agriculturally zoned acreage homesite pass you by and come take a tour before it is sold. 
 

Located minutes to downtown Fort McCoy with grocery store, doctor office, pharmacy, hardware, gas station, pizza delivery and more. Close to Silver Springs which is great for kayaking, boating and outdoor activities. Ocala is just another 20 minutes away with Walmart, Lowes, Bealls, Outback and many more of your favorite shopping and  restaurants. Gainesville(Home of Florida Gators) is only 50 minutes to downtown. If you’re a fisherman, hunter or simply love hiking, canoeing or kayaking you are in luck! Minutes to Ocklawaha River, Rodman Reservoir boat ramp, Ocala National Forest and many natural springs(Salt Springs, Silver Glen Springs, Juniper Springs), horseback and walking trails, and off road vehicle trails awaits your explorations. One of a kind property and location! Ready for new owners! 

  • 11.24 Acres
  • Wooded 
  • Zoned A-1 (Agriculture) 
  • Paved Road Frontage

Asking Price $112,400 

 

Please call/text (352) 572-1739 or email info@homesforsaleocalamarion.com for more info!

2216 SE Ashley Court Ocala, FL 34471

2216 SE Ashley Court Ocala, FL 34471

Stunning features in this previous builder’s pool home. This lovely home is located in the Laurel Run gated subdivision with beautiful flowing creeks and soaring majestic trees throughout this in-town SE Ocala location. The home was originally built in 1989 and includes 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, 2846 living square feet and oversized 3 car garage with 1036 square feet. The cul-de-sac home sits on .40 acres and provides tons of privacy with mature landscaping and fencing. The entrance to the home has a waterfall and water feature including your own Koi pond. Upon entering the home you will see beautiful double wood doors, tiled foyer and soaring ceilings. There is a formal dining room to your left and den to the right which also leads to nicely sized office. The living room and most of the home has hard wood floors (some flooring need replaced in hallway and bedrooms 2 & 3). The living room has vaulted ceilings with 3 double french doors overlooking caged pool, built in hot tub and covered patio. The kitchen is spacious with loads of wood cabinets, tons of granite countertop space, walk-in pantry.  All appliances, including JennAir cooktop and double oven, are included. Just off the kitchen is an oversized laundry room with custom built cabinets and large storage closets.  The laundry room leads to a 1/2 bath with convenient access to the pool deck and outdoor shower. The outside covered patio wraps around kitchen and makes a great place to cook, open the windows and enjoy the pool and outdoor activities from inside the home. The main bedroom is very spacious with french doors leading to the pool area too. The main bathroom includes a huge walk-in shower, privacy toilet, double sinks w/ granite tops and a large walk-in closet. The guest bedrooms are spacious in size with high ceilings and jack and jill bathroom with tile floors and tub/shower. 

Outside the home has beautiful mature landscaping and stately oak trees to 0provide shade year round and lots of privacy. The caged pool area includes custom built in hot tub w/ waterfall, ornamental tree, lots of space for entertaining, natural gas grill hook up, and a seating bar/eating area that wraps around the inside kitchen. 

Home was recently appraised for $560,000 and does need some TLC. The seller is offering the home at $550,000 for the work that needs completed. Below are all of the updates completed by the seller.

New Roof: November 2021

New Windows / French Door for Master Bedroom: February 2022

New HVAC Main Home: October 2021

New HVAC Master Suite: February 2014

Kitchen and Master Bath Renovation: 2017

Pool Re-tile and Marsite: 2017

Pool Deck Pavers: 2017

New Interior Floors and Tile: 2014

Pool Screen: 2011


 

Functional Spaces at Home

10 Ways to Make a Room More Functional

  1. Maximize vertical space
    Take advantage of wall height by adding tall bookcases, cabinets or shelves, or by hanging hooks for jackets in the hallway, separate office or study, add a desk in a corner of a bedroom or living room, preferably under a window to take advantage of the natural light and to keep your back turned from distractions like the TV and bed.
  2. Keep traffic paths clear
    Avoid bumping into furniture by creating an efficient layout. Make direct paths to commonly used zones and leave enough space to manoeuvre around each piece of furniture. 
  3. Control clutter
    Get rid of items you no longer need or use, deal with paperwork as it comes in, file important items in labelled folders or boxes, and return everything to its original place when you’re done with it.
  4. Add storage
    Store like items – such as cleaning products or bathroom supplies – in labelled boxes or plastic bins. For particularly unkempt areas, purchase storage options like an over-the-door rack to get shoes off the floor, or a closet-size second shelving unit to stash seasonal clothing.
  5. Create a nook
    If you don’t have the luxury of a separate office or study, add a desk in a corner of a bedroom or living room, preferably under a window to take advantage of the natural light and to keep your back turned from distractions like the TV and bed. 
  6. Use a room for what it’s intended
    Keep the children’s toys in their bedrooms or playroom and out of the living room, do paperwork or homework in a home office or den – not the dining room – and move all of your craft or woodworking projects out of the kitchen and down into the basement or crafts room.
  7. Store items in the rooms in which they’re used
    Keep table linens in the dining room, books and magazines in the den, dish towels in the kitchen, and detergent in the laundry room.
  8. Purchase double-duty furnishings
    Select pieces that are versatile, such as a coffee table with a shelf for magazines and books, a lighting for reading, eating or writing, and for setting the mood.
  9. Have multiple table surfaces
    Rather than having to get out of your chair every time you want a sip of coffee, make sure that there are enough surfaces within arm’s reach of living room seating to hold items such as drinks, books, table lamps and reading glasses.
  10. Purchase efficient lighting
    Ensure that your space has table lamps, floor lamps and other lighting for reading, eating or writing, and for setting the mood.

Thanks for reading!

Questions To Ask When Buying Homeowners Insurance

For many homebuyers, property insurance is a detail, a box to be checked off on the way to closing. But details are important and missteps can be expensive. Purchasing insurance may not be as fun as choosing new furniture and paint colors, but it’s a critical part of the homebuying process. Your homeowners insurance policy is a financial safety net in case of a disaster, so you’ll want to ask a few important questions to make sure you have the coverage you need at a price you can afford.

What’s the dwelling coverage per square foot?

Imagine that a fire burned your house to the ground and your policy didn’t pay out enough to rebuild it. That could happen if your dwelling coverage – the part of your policy that covers the structure of your home – is too low.

To prevent this, don’t simply accept the initial dwelling coverage amount an insurance company recommends. “Insurance companies use replacement cost calculators, but they’re not 100% accurate by any means,” says Ryan Andrew, president of The Andrew Agency, an independent insurance agency serving Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C.

For a more accurate estimate, ask your insurer to send someone to your house for a replacement evaluation, suggests Amy Bach, executive director of United Policyholders, a nonprofit that advocates for insurance consumers. You can also ask a local builder who specializes in new construction to estimate your home’s rebuilding cost per square foot.

Once you’ve chosen an appropriate dwelling limit, consider adding extended replacement cost coverage to your policy. With this coverage, your insurer will pay 10% to 50% more than your dwelling coverage amount to help you rebuild. This could save you thousands of dollars if building prices spike for unforeseen reasons such as a lumber shortage or high demand after a disaster.

A typically pricier option, guaranteed replacement cost coverage, will pay to rebuild your home regardless of expense.

Do I have multiple deductibles?

Homeowners may not realize that on some policies, higher deductibles may apply for claims due to wind, hail, named storms or other disasters.

For example, say a hurricane causes wind damage to your roof. Your insurance policy might have a wind deductible worth 5% of your dwelling coverage rather than the $1,000 deductible that applies to most other claims, Andrew says. So if your house were covered for $250,000, you’d have to pay for the first $12,500 of damage before your insurer paid anything.

Getting quotes from multiple insurers may help you reduce or eliminate these high deductibles.

What isn’t covered?

You might be unpleasantly surprised by your policy’s exclusions. “Flood insurance, which is excluded on almost all homeowners policies, is definitely a big one,” Andrew says, adding that this is especially important for homeowners with finished basements.

Even houses that aren’t near a body of water could experience flooding during heavy downpours, Andrew says, and a standard homeowners policy is unlikely to cover any damage.

You can buy flood insurance through companies that participate in the National Flood Insurance Program. The program’s average flood claim payout was $52,000 in 2019.

Andrew also suggests adding water backup coverage to your policy. This pays for damage due to water backing up into your house from sewer lines, sump pumps or other water lines.

Another common coverage gap involves keeping up with current building laws. “If you have to make improvements when you’re repairing or replacing (your home) because the codes have changed since your house was built, a typical policy will exclude that,” Bach says. Though this can be particularly expensive for older homes, “even a house that was built five years ago is out of code,” Andrew says.

Both Bach and Andrew recommend adding ordinance or law coverage to your policy to handle these expenses.

How can I save?

While having the right coverage is generally more important than paying the bare minimum, there are discounts to make your policy more affordable. Andrew suggests buying your car, homeowners and other insurance through the same company to take advantage of bundling discounts, which can save you 20% or more.

“The best way to bring down the price without sacrificing coverage is to raise your deductible,” Bach says. Being willing to pay for smaller repairs yourself rather than filing claims will help keep your premiums low.

If you’re confused about coverage and discounts, reach out to an insurance agent to talk through your options. “Take a little extra time to understand what it is that you’re purchasing,” Andrew says. “For most people a house is the most expensive asset they have.”

March Newsletter

It is officially March and the start to a new month!

In the March issue of our newsletter you will find events this month, featured listings, market predictions for 2021, and how to follow us on social media.

Click the attachment to check it out!

Please don’t hesitate to reach out with any of your real estate needs.

March Newsletter

Duke Rountree
Rountree Realty Corp.
Broker / Owner
Call / Text 352-572-1739
Info@Search352Homes.com
Search352Homes.com

Home Design Trends

There are plenty of reasons to look forward to 2021, especially when it comes to the home. After a year that guided many of us to spend more time at home, the new year is an opportunity to bring comfort and creativity to our living spaces. From calming room ideas to stylish (and smart) approaches to home office design, we are predicting 5 of the biggest interior design trends for 2021.

Grandmillennial Grandeur

“Grandmillennial” (modern takes on granny chic) style might be a surprising trend on the surface (it’s the exact opposite of sleek, modern minimalism) – but it actually fits in well with what we’re currently craving in our homes. Cozy details a la grandma’s house, pretty florals, and elegance definitely have a place in the 2021 design landscape.

Plenty of Plants

It seems like 2020 was the year that many of us went back to the basics (hello, green thumbs) and chances are that these primal habits will continue to grow in 2021 – especially when it comes to indoor plants. Incorporating house plants into your decor can help refresh your air and brighten your mood.

Multi-Functional Spaces

This past year has made many of us rethink how we use our rooms. When spending more time at home, it makes less sense to dedicate whole rooms to just one purpose – especially in smaller spaces. With this is mind, we’re betting that we’ll see creative storage and design solutions to help dining room, living rooms, and bedrooms double up as home offices and workspaces. 

Walls on the Wild Side

When it come to interior design trends, we tend to focus a lot on what’s between our walls, but what about what’s on the walls themselves? While paint is always popular, textured, bold, and unusual finishes like floral wallpaper fabric upholstery or even a living wall can add a fresh feel to our spaces in the year to come.

Earthy Tones

You’ve probably picked up on one of the overarching themes for home decor in the year to come: a return to nature and earthy inspiration. This feeling extends to color trends, as warm, comforting color palettes (think wine reds, golden yellows, and sage greens) take precedence. 

Hey, Buyers: These Home Appraisal Tips Are for You

Most people have deeply personal reasons for wanting to buy a home. Maybe it’s the bathroom that feels like a dreamy, modern spa. Or that two-tiered deck just made for parties.

Your lender doesn’t care about the freestanding tub. Or the built-in outdoor fire pit. Their only concern is that the house you buy is worth as much as the value of your mortgage.

To them, a house isn’t a home. It’s collateral. (Harsh, but true.) If someday, for some reason, you can’t make your mortgage payments, the lender can foreclose on the home and sell it to recoup all or some of its costs. (Even harsher, but also true.)

For that reason, a home must be valued at, or above, the agreed-upon purchase price, and this has to happen before you can close on a house. That’s where a home appraiser comes in. 

A Home Appraiser Is Neutral (Like Switzerland)

After you sign a home purchase agreement (the contract between you and the seller about the terms of the pending sale), and before your lender approves your loan, the home you’re buying must pass an appraisal — an assessment of the property’s value by an unbiased third party: the appraiser.

An appraiser is a state-licensed or -certified professional. Their job is to assess an opinion of value — how much a house is worth. The appraiser is on no one’s side. They don’t represent you or the seller; instead, this person is a contractor chosen by your lender through an appraisal management company (AMC), a separate, neutral entity that maintains a roster of appraisers.

Appraisers survey a house in person, using five main criteria to determine the value of a home:

  • Location
  • Age
  • Condition
  • Additions or renovations
  • Recent sales of comparable homes

Be Prepared to Pay for the Appraisal — or to Negotiate

Generally speaking, the home buyer is responsible for paying for the appraisal — and the fee is typically wrapped into your closing costs. However, who pays for appraisal is negotiable. It never hurts to see if the seller is willing to cover it.

How much money are we talking about? The average professional home appraisal will run between $287 and $373, according to estimates by the home-professionals resource HomeAdvisor.com. Costs can vary depending on the square footage and quirks of the house, with higher appraisal prices for larger or more unique homes.

Appraisals Take a While, So Be Patient

Typically, a purchase agreement has a “home appraisal contingency” requiring that the appraisal be completed within 14 days of the sales contract being signed. Because it takes appraisers some time to visit your house and write a report — up to a week, or longer in a busy housing market — your lender will order the appraisal immediately after you sign the purchase agreement.

So, You Have a Valuation. Here’s What It Means — and What to Do Next

When the appraisal is finished, the appraiser issues a written report with his or her opinion of the value of the home. To produce the report, they use their analysis of the property and data from comparable homes, as well as review the purchase offer. The report will outline their methodology and also include photographs that they’ve taken of the property, inside and out.

You and your lender will both receive a copy of the report. Three things could happen next: 

  1. If the appraiser’s valuation matches the price you and the seller agreed to for the home: Your lender will proceed to underwrite your loan. Great news: This is the final step in your loan-getting process!
  2. If the appraiser’s valuation is higher than what you’re paying for the home:Congratulations! You’ve gained immediate equity. How, you ask? Let’s say, for example, you’re paying $200,000 for the house. If the appraiser says it’s worth $250,000 — jackpot. That’s an instant $50,000 in equity. (Keep in mind, this is very rare.)
  3. If the appraisal is lower than what you’ve agreed to pay for the home: Your lender won’t give you a loan for more than the appraised value. If you and the seller agreed on $200,000, for example, but the appraisal is $190,000, that creates a $10,000 shortfall. So what happens next?

Don’t despair — not yet. If you’re faced with a low appraisal, there are several ways the deal can still go through.

If an Appraisal Is Low, You Can Still Make It Work

Before we talk strategy, some reasons why appraisals come in lower than expected:

  • The seller overvalued the price of the home. 
  • The appraiser isn’t familiar with the neighborhood.
  • The appraiser overlooked pending sales data.
  • The appraiser had trouble finding comparable homes, or missed comparable homes, so they compared your home with properties outside the neighborhood.
  • Home prices in the area are changing so fast that the listing agent’s price no longer reflects the market.
  • The appraiser rushed the job.

If the appraisal comes in low, your agent will offer recommendations about how to proceed. In general, your best strategy is to persuade the seller to lower the sales price, or to split the difference between the home’s appraised value and the price with you. This is when you can rely on your agent — and their negotiating skills — to go to bat for you.

You can also appeal the appraisal assessment. You’ll work with your agent to research comparable homes that support the sales price you agreed upon with the seller and present this information to your lender, who will forward it to the appraiser for a re-evaluation of the home’s value. Ultimately, though, it’s up to the appraiser to decide whether to revise their valuation of the property.

Alternately, you can ask your lender for a second appraisal, though there are caveats:

  • You’ll have to pay for it out of pocket (or persuade the seller to foot the bill).
  • You’re more likely able to challenge an appraisal for a conventional loan than a government loan. And you’d need solid facts to back it up in either case.
  • There’s no guarantee that it will be higher and meet the sales price.

The last option: You can come up with the cash yourself to cover the difference between the home’s price and the appraised value. 

If you don’t want to take that route (and who could blame you?), a purchase agreement’s home appraisal contingency gives you the ability to walk away from the deal scot-free, and with your earnest money deposit in hand.

Let’s assume it all works out. With the appraisal behind you, you’ll be one step closer to closing on that house.

What to Expect During a Home Inspection

You’ll go through many emotions while having a home inspection conducted. Excitement for hopefully buying/selling your home, nervous that something will be wrong, or feeling your patience thinning out as you wonder how long this process will take. However, a home inspection is an important part of the home buying/selling process, so we’re going to go through it with you.

A Home Inspector Is Your Protector

An inspector helps you make sure a house isn’t hiding anything before you commit for the long haul. (Think about it this way: You wouldn’t even get coffee with a stranger without checking out their history.)

A home inspector identifies any reasonably discoverable problems with the house (a leaky roof, faulty plumbing, etc.). Hiring an inspector is you doing your due diligence. To find a good one (more on how to do that soon), it helps to have an understanding of what the typical home inspection entails. 

An inspection is all about lists. 

Before an inspection, the home inspector will review the seller’s property disclosure statement. (Each state has its own requirements for what sellers must disclose on these forms; some have stronger requirements than others.) The statement lists any flaws the seller is aware of that could negatively affect the home’s value. 

The disclosure comes in the form of an outline, covering such things as:

  • Mold 
  • Pest infestation
  • Roof leaks
  • Foundation damage
  • Other problems, depending on what your state mandates.

During the inspection, an inspector has three tasks — to:

  1. Identify problems with the house that he or she can see
  2. Suggest fixes
  3. Prepare a written report, usually with photos, noting observed defects

This report is critical to you and your agent — it’s what you’ll use to request repairs from the seller. (We’ll get into how you’ll do that in a minute, too.)

The Inspector Won’t Check Everything

Generally, inspectors only examine houses for problems that can be seen with the naked eye. They won’t be tearing down walls or using magical X-ray vision, to find hidden faults.

Inspectors also won’t put themselves in danger. If a roof is too high or steep, for example, they won’t climb up to check for missing or damaged shingles. They’ll use binoculars to examine it instead.

They can’t predict the future, either. While an inspector can give you a rough idea of how many more years that roof will hold up, he or she can’t tell you exactly when it will need to be replaced.

Finally, home inspectors are often generalists. A basic inspection doesn’t routinely include a thorough evaluation of:

  • Swimming pools
  • Wells
  • Septic systems
  • Structural engineering work
  • The ground beneath a home
  • Fireplaces and chimneys

It’s Your Job to Check the Inspector

Now you’re ready to connect with someone who’s a pro at doing all of the above. Here’s where — once again — your real estate agent has your back. He or she can recommend reputable home inspectors to you.

In addition to getting recommendations (friends and relatives are handy for those, too), you can look for professional inspectors at their trade association websites. The American Society of Home Inspectors’ (ASHI) Find a Home Inspector tool lets you search by address, metro area, or neighborhood. You can also search for inspectors by state at InterNACHI.

You’ll want to interview at least three inspectors before deciding whom to hire. During each chat, ask questions such as:

  • Are you licensed or certified? Inspector certifications vary, based on where you live. Not every state requires home inspectors to be licensed, and licenses can indicate different degrees of expertise. ASHI lists each state’s requirements here. 
  • How long have you been in the business? Look for someone with at least five years of experience — it indicates more homes inspected.
  • How much do you charge? Home inspection costs range from $260 to $399. The costs vary according to your location and the size of your house.
  • What do you check, exactly? Know what you’re getting for your money.
  • What don’t you check, specifically? Some home inspectors are more thorough than others.
  • How soon after the inspection will I receive my report? Home inspection contingencies require you to complete the inspection within a certain period of time after the offer is accepted — normally five to seven days — so you’re on a set timetable. A good home inspector will provide you with the report within 24 hours after the inspection.
  • May I see a sample report? This will help you gauge how detailed the inspector is and how he or she explains problems.

Sometimes you can find online reviews of inspectors on sites like Angie’s List and Yelp, too, if past clients’ feedback is helpful in making your decision.

Show Up for Inspection (and Bring Your Agent)

It’s inspection day, and the honor of your — and your agent’s — presence is not required, but highly recommended. Even though you’ll receive a report summarizing the findings later on, being there gives you a chance to ask questions, and to learn the inner workings of the home.

Block out two to three hours for the inspection. The inspector will survey the property from top to bottom. This includes checking water pressure; leaks in the attic, plumbing, etc.; if door and window frames are straight (if not, it could be a sign of a structural issue); if electrical wiring is up to code; if smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are working; if appliances work properly. Outside, he or she will look at things like siding, fencing, and drainage.

The inspector might also be able to check for termites, asbestos, lead paint, or radon. Because these tests involve more legwork and can require special certification, they come at an additional charge.

Get Ready to Negotiate

Once you receive the inspector’s report, review it with your agent.

Legally, sellers are required to make certain repairs. These can vary depending on location. Most sales contracts require the seller to fix: 

  • Structural defects
  • Building code violations
  • Safety issues

Most home repairs, however, are negotiable. Be prepared to pick your battles: Minor issues, like a cracked switchplate or loose kitchen faucet, are easy and cheap to fix on your own. You don’t want to start nickel-and-diming the seller. 

If there are major issues with the house, your agent can submit a formal request for repairs that includes a copy of the inspection report. Repair requests should be as specific as possible. For instance: Instead of saying “repair broken windows,” a request should say “replace broken window glass in master bathroom.”

  • If the seller agrees to make all of your repair requests: He or she must provide you with invoices from a licensed contractor stating that the repairs were made. Then it’s full steam ahead toward the sale.
  • If the seller responds to your repair requests with a counteroffer: He or she will state which repairs (or credits at closing) he or she is willing to make. The ball is in your court to either agree, counter the seller’s counteroffer, or void the transaction.

At the end of the day, remember to check in with yourself to see how you’re feeling about all of this. You need to be realistic about how much repair work you’d be taking on. At this point in the sale, there’s a lot of pressure from all parties to move into the close. But if you don’t feel comfortable, speak up.

The most important things to remember during the home inspection? Trust your inspector, trust your gut, and lean on your agent — they likely have a lot of experience to support your decision-making.

That’s something to feel good about.